People Moves

Abercrombie & Fitch names Holly May chief human resources officer

May joins Abercrombie & Fitch Co. from Starbucks, where she served as the senior VP Global Total Rewards and Service Delivery.

Abercrombie & Fitch Co. has appointed Holly May as its chief human resources officer.

In this role, the firm said May will lead the company’s global human resources function and strategy, including talent management and leadership development, diversity and inclusion, compensation and benefits, and all other facets of organisational, talent and culture building initiatives.

May joins Abercrombie & Fitch Co. from Starbucks, where she served as the senior VP Global Total Rewards and Service Delivery. In that role, she was responsible for consulting with both the Starbucks board of directors and the executive leadership team on the strategic direction of Starbucks’ global compensation and benefits portfolio.

She also managed 100+ associates across the company’s global rewards, executive performance management, global mobility and immigration, university recruiting, HR transformation, policy and governance, HR technology, PMO/portfolio delivery, and payroll and tax teams.

Prior to her time at Starbucks, May served in human resources leadership roles of increasing responsibility at ING, Voya Financial, and Visa Inc., including in the areas of HR strategy, HR business partner, diversity and inclusion, and compensation and benefits.

In her new role she will report directly to CEO Fran Horowitz.

Horowitz said: “We are pleased to welcome Holly to Abercrombie & Fitch Co. Her extensive senior HR experience across a diverse group of publicly traded companies makes her a valuable addition to our team.

“Holly’s innovative nature, passion for people, and commitment to aligning with global business objectives to drive success will be instrumental to our progress – particularly as we continue to enhance our talent management, global capabilities and diversity and inclusion efforts.”

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