Job Market

Pilots top earners in first 20 years of their career

It was also found that financial managers and PR directors are the two career paths likely to reach a salary of £100k or more the quickest at 18 years

Pilots can earn as much as £1.1 million in the first 20 years of their career, according to new analysis of ONS and recruitment industry data by CV writing service Standout CV

The report which aims to highlight what the biggest paying jobs in the UK are, also revealed that senior police officers are the 10th highest paid in the ONS analysis with an average salary of £56k. It is believed that they earn the most in the first 10 years of their career due to a “lack of training debt”. 

It was also found that financial managers and PR directors are the two career paths likely to reach a salary of £100k or more the quickest at 18 years. 

CEOs have the 2nd highest average salary in the UK at £85k however they accumulate less in 20 years than pilots, financial managers, PR directors, and senior police officers. 

Andrew Fennell, director and careers expert at Standout CV said: “According to the latest ONS data used in our study, the 10 highest paying roles in the UK pay an average of £71,000. However, as our study also shows the career path is never simple when it comes to earnings.

“If you’re just starting or thinking about a new career, it’s important to consider the costs that could be involved in breaking into a new job market and career; be that through educational courses, professional training, or even licence fees, there are plenty of commitments you must understand before starting a new career.”

He added: “As our study shows, many of the top-paying roles in the UK require high fees to be paid to get a foot in the door, which for many could be both a deterrent and worry for those from less privileged backgrounds. 

“It’s positive to see that such a key service like the police force provides free training and a salary that competes with other high-paid careers like CEOs and financial managers.”

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