Job Market

Permanent hiring up 38% in January

The statistics also reveal that while year-on-year permanent vacancies were down 28%, the annual percentage fall is continuing to decrease

Permanent hiring in UK job roles was up 38% in January, according to  figures by The Association of Professional Staffing Companies (APSCo).

The data revealed that following the usual dip in recruitment activity over the Christmas period, hiring bounced back in January for both contract and permanent jobs with roles up 42% and 38% respectively – indicating that the current climate “isn’t hampering the regrowth from the pandemic”.

The statistics also reveal that while year-on-year permanent vacancies were down 28%, the annual percentage fall is continuing to decrease. In December, the year-on-year drop stood at 32% signalling a 4% improvement in January. In comparison, contract vacancies were down by only 11% year-on-year – a 5% improvement on December where the drop was 16%.

Ann Swain, CEO of APSCo said:“It’s incredibly encouraging to see such a healthy uptick in vacancies for both permanent and contract roles month-on-month following the usual seasonal dip in December. 

“While we entered the New Year with the announcement of another national lockdown, schools closing once more, and a return to widespread remote working, our data suggest that this hasn’t dampened hiring intentions with businesses remaining optimistic despite the current restrictions.”

She added: “In addition, the fact that the percentage drop in year-on-year vacancies for permanent jobs is closing indicates we are certainly moving in the right direction. 

“It is also interesting to note that we are seeing higher value contract placements indicative of the increasing reliance on the professional contingent workforce as employers turn to agile and flexible hiring solutions in an uncertain market.”

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