Job Market

Over half of Brits concerned about post-pandemic job prospects

The study also found that 60% of working Brits believe the workplace will have to adapt to fit new ways of working and recruiting talent

51% of British employees and 54% of London workers are concerned that finding the right type of work will be harder post-pandemic, a new study by consultancy agency Future Strategy Club (FSC) has found. 

According to the agency, the concern has stemmed from young people and office workers migrating out of London due to the pandemic – with 22% of Londoners moving back to their family home for lockdown. 

It is believed that office workers are now concerned that the dispersion of talent will lead to reduced networking opportunities and job openings. However, FSC said this is set to give rise to a “new way of working”, creating a nomad generation as businesses aren’t “tied to desks and location”.

The study also found that 60% of working Brits believe the workplace will have to adapt to fit new ways of working and recruiting talent, or they will be tempted to leave the 9-5 lifestyle for good, in favour of freelancing or consulting. 

Justin Small, co-founder of Future Strategy Club, said: “The data shows that there has been a seismic shift in London’s demographics, with huge proportions of young people and office workers migrating out of London for the pandemic, and raising concerns about their future. 

“This signals an overall shift in the world of work, that’s unlikely to return to what it was pre-pandemic.”

She added: “Work will become more flexible and nomadic, as individuals have learnt more about what they want from their workplace and career. The next year or so will see ongoing options for remote working, increased support for skilled workers, and a boom in freelancing is likely as there was following the 2008 financial crisis.”

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