Women in garment factories experience higher Covid-19 death rates, statistics show | HR Wire
CoronavirusEmployee Relations

Women in garment factories experience higher Covid-19 death rates, statistics show

According to the latest analysis published by the Office for National Statistics (ONS) of deaths registered between 9 March and 28 December 2020, women sewing machinists have the highest Covid-19 fatality rate (64.8 deaths per 100,000) of any female occupation

Women working in Britain’s garment factories are four times more likely to die from Covid-19 than the average female worker. According to the latest analysis published by the Office for National Statistics (ONS), amongst the number of deaths registred between 9 March and 28 December 2020, women sewing machinists had the highest Covid-19 fatality rate (64.8 deaths per 100,000) of any female occupation. This rate is higher than that of women working in at-risk sectors like caring, leisure and other service occupations (27.3 deaths per 100,000). Ben Humberstone, head of health analysis and life... Subscribe to read full artical

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Women in garment factories experience higher Covid-19 death rates, statistics show | HR Wire
Women in garment factories experience higher Covid-19 death rates, statistics show | HR Wire
CoronavirusEmployee Relations

Women in garment factories experience higher Covid-19 death rates, statistics show

According to the latest analysis published by the Office for National Statistics (ONS) of deaths registered between 9 March and 28 December 2020, women sewing machinists have the highest Covid-19 fatality rate (64.8 deaths per 100,000) of any female occupation

Women working in Britain’s garment factories are four times more likely to die from Covid-19 than the average female worker. According to the latest analysis published by the Office for National Statistics (ONS), amongst the number of deaths registred between 9 March and 28 December 2020, women sewing machinists had the highest Covid-19 fatality rate (64.8 deaths per 100,000) of any female occupation. This rate is higher than that of women working in at-risk sectors like caring, leisure and other service occupations (27.3 deaths per 100,000). Ben Humberstone, head of health analysis and life... Subscribe to read full artical

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