Coronavirus

73% of workers want split between home and office working post-pandemic

Only 20% of total respondents want to work remotely 100% of the time, while just 7% want to work from the office full time

73% of UK workers want to split their time between home and office working after the pandemic, a new study by digital workplace provider Claromentis reveals. 

According to the company, the average employee wants to work from home for around two-thirds of their working week, and spend around a third of their time working from the office.

It was also found that 60% of those who favour a hybrid arrangement want the “flexibility to drop into the office and co-work with their team when it suits them”, while 29% would prefer set days each week when the whole company has to be in the office. 

The least popular option was credits or vouchers for a co-working space local to their homes – which was only preferred by 5% of respondents.

By contrast, only 20% of total respondents want to work remotely 100% of the time, while just 7% want to work from the office full time. 

Nigel Davies, CEO and founder of Claromentis, said: “Our survey, undertaken during the third national Covid-19 lockdown, suggests a ‘best of both’ remote-office arrangement, with plenty of flexibility, is the future for knowledge work. 

“This arrangement would certainly dilute the downsides of remote work, which can include feeling socially disconnected, while teams enjoy the many benefits.”

He added: “It’s at this point in time – many months into this grand-scale, forced remote work experiment – that leaders can start to be less reactive and more proactive, and find meaningful ways to improve the home working experience based on what we’ve learnt so far.

“There are many opportunities for improvement, not least building a digital workplace that supports good communication, collaboration, project management, continuous learning and culture.”

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