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65% of workers say commuting stress increased during pandemic

The accountancy and consultancy firm released its first nationally representative survey which involved over 2,000 UK adults which looked at the impact of the 'new normal' working conditions in the UK

Two-thirds of the UK workforce (65%) reported that commuting during the pandemic was the most stressful part of the day, according to Theta Global Advisors.

The accountancy and consultancy firm released its first nationally representative survey which involved over 2,000 UK adults which looked at the impact of the ‘new normal’ working conditions in the UK.

The survey revealed that 57% of the respondents did not want to go back to the normal way of working in an office environment with normal office hours. Additionally, nearly half of all UK business leaders (45%) said they believed that the working environment will change for the better due to the pandemic and lockdown restrictions.

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Almost a quarter (24%) of the respondents said their employer hasn’t explored any flexible working options despite the effect of the pandemic

Chris Biggs, MD and founder of Theta Global Advisors, said: “From the removal of the commute to boosted productivity when working from home, there are numerous benefits to flexible working that the pandemic has uncovered for millions of employers and employees alike.

“Now, as we head back into nationwide lockdown, many workers will be looking forward to being able to work more flexibly and comfortably, but there will also be a number of people whose employers are still reluctant to compromise.”

He added: “Business leaders would do well to realise that the ‘new normal’ of flexible, remote working is here to stay, and should adapt now to pivot their business, remove unnecessary overheads and commit to a plan for a post-Covid future.”

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